4 Common Costs That You Can Actually Avoid Easily

Everyone has their own habits that they don’t want other people to find out, but aside from the weird and disgusting habits, there are also the ones that could make wallets and piggy banks cry. These are the wasteful spending habits that make you wonder where all your money goes when you take a look at your bank account or your wallet.

Be sure to watch out for these small things that are making you spend more money than you should:

Paying for unused subscriptions

Are you still subscribed to that Netflix account you don’t have time to long into? How about that gym membership you never got around to actually using because of your hectic schedule? If your answer to this is yes, you can start saving money right now by cancelling your subscription to these services. It’s still okay to retain some subscriptions, but only if you’re still using them actively.

Recreational shopping

When you’re trying to save as much as you can, one of the worst things you can do for a hobby is shopping. Not only is it expensive, but the feeling of happiness you also get from every haul only lasts for a really short amount of time. In fact, the more you shop recreationally, the more likely you want to spend money to buy more and keep that feeling going, and this can drain your wallet or bank account really quick.

Losing receipts

Do you have a tendency to just throw away your receipts without reading them? If so, make it a habit to always keep them the next time you go out shopping for anything that you want or need as part of your daily expenses. Keeping your receipts and writing them down is a great way to track down your expenses and find out where most of your money goes.

Once you do know where, you can budget around it to better suit your needs. Keeping receipts also let you avail of warranties when dealing with factory defects, allowing you to take back the defective item and replace it with a brand-new unit.

Letting food spoil

Saving money on food might seem simple at first, but it really takes a lot of effort to be able to cook your own dishes that you can bring to work or eat at home. If you’re too tired to do this, you might find yourself wanting to save time ordering take-out instead. While this may be fine once in a while, you’ll notice that this will make you more likely to forget about the groceries or leftovers you have in your fridge, and leaving them to spoil.

How Blue Light from Devices Hurts Your Eyes

While everybody already knows that too much exposure to sunlight and air pollution can affect us and it’s sometimes just better to stay indoors, not many people really understand that the same indoor environment can also be damaging to the skin and eyes.

This is because of blue light, which more studies are showing to be responsible for creating free radicals that can harm both skin and eyes much like ultraviolet light.

And because nearly all of our workdays are spent exposed to signficant amounts of it, the effects can compound and result in significant damage over time. But what exactly is blue light, and how exactly can it damage you?

Photodamage and Blue Light

Blue light is the light on one end of the visible spectrum that has the shortest wavelength, with yellow and red lights on the other end of that spectrum and having the longest wavelengths.

However, blue light has a really high energy, giving it the name “high-energy visible” light. This high-energy light usually comes from sunlight, but it can also come from the screens of different devices, such as computers and smartphones, as well as fluorescent lights commonly used in offices.

Negative Effects of Blue Light

While our eyes are capable of blocking out ultraviolet light, it’s not as good at blocking blue light. This means that it can have some pretty bad effects after exposure to significant amounts over time, such as the following:

  • It increases the risk of eye strain
  • It contributes to macular and retinal degeneration
  • It can cause uneven skin pigmentation

Reducing Blue Light Exposure

Keep in mind that not all blue light is bad, however – more studies are also showing that a certain amount of it is essential for good health. In fact, in the right levels, it can boost alertness as well as help with memory and cognitive functions.

What makes it bad is too much exposure, so the best thing you can do is to limit your exposure when you can in order to reduce the harmful effects that it can have. You can limit your exposure to blue light by using two things:

  • Using blue light filters on your devices – The good news is that there are now more devices that include a feature that filters the blue light emitted from the screen, especially in the case of smartphones and tablets. You can even have physical filters installed for your phones and computers installed for this purpose.
  • Investing in protective eyewear – Special pairs of glasses dedicated for use around computers have yellow lenses in order to decrease the wavelength of blue light, and they are usually available without a specific eyeglass prescription.

7 Principles on Building Wealth Taught in a Book Way Older than You

Considered a classic book on financial advice, The Richest Man in Babylon was published in 1926 by George S. Clason as a collection of parables from ancient Babylon. Almost a century from its first release, it still remains in print because of the valuable lessons it teaches regarding money.

1.  The Start: Keep 10 percent of your income

Simply put, you can start “fattening your purse” by saving 10 percent of your income. In the parable, Arkad uses an egg basket as an example. If you put 10 eggs in the basket in the morning and take 9 out in the evening, you’ll have one more extra egg for the next morning. Arkad likens this idea to saving money. If you are able to keep 10 percent of your income, you’ll slowly build up wealth.

2.  Control your expenses

Arkad teaches that though everyone has different labors and incomes, if they all equally have no money, it’s because they easily confuse desires with necessities. This also very much applies to our time today. The second principle, then, tells us to learn how to spend less than we make.

3.  Make your money multiply

If you want to build your wealth, it won’t do you any good to keep your savings untouched. What this means is that you should open up part of your savings to make investments. This simply means you have more than one way to gain income. Invest in stocks, look for real estate investments in Singapore, and etc.

4.  Invest smartly

Guard your money against loss by making smart purchases and investments. Arkad told a story about how he lost his savings because he gave it to a brickmaker who went to look for jewels as an investment. His mentor then asked him why he would go to a brickmaker who has no knowledge of jewels, and not the jeweler.

5.  Use your dwelling for profit

Let’s say you’ve attained a certain amount of wealth and you’re able to buy a small apartment building. You keep a part of it as your dwelling and you rent out the other rooms. This is another way for you to get money easily. Getting paid for rent is, of course, better than you paying for it.

6.  Guarantee a future income

As we all know, it becomes harder to work as we age. The sixth principle tells us to plan ahead of retirement. By keeping long-term investments, you’ll be confident that you can still get money even you’re no longer able to work.

7.  Learn, Learn, Learn

Simply put, if you have a lot of skills to offer, you’ll have more opportunities to work and earn. Building wealth comes with learning new skills. If you learn a new language, for example, you’ll be much more valuable in a business. That said, broaden your horizons and keep learning!

How to Get Rid of Weird Smells in Your Fridge in 5 Simple Steps

Funny smells in your refrigerator aren’t always a sign that something’s wrong with the fridge itself, but that doesn’t mean you should ignore it when you smell it – in fact, having that funny odor in your fridge is reason enough to find out what exactly is causing it. And if the case is usually leftovers gone bad, it’s time to not just throw them away, but also to clean out your fridge to remove the smell.

Here’s how you can do it:  

Clean it out completely

Cleaning out your refrigerator may be the most daunting step, but once you’ve managed to clear everything out, everything else will be much simpler and easier. When cleaning out your fridge, be sure to keep your frozen produce separate in an icebox to keep them cold while you clean. And since you’ll be holding the door open, you might also consider unplugging and de-frosting your interior.

Use natural cleaners

When it comes to cleaning appliances, your safest best is making sure to use only natural ingredients that are completely safe: baking soda and vinegar. Simply pour half a cup of baking soda dissolved in a bucket of warm water and scrub the mixture all over the surfaces of your fridge. To really make it shine, mix equal parts of white vinegar and water after the baking soda mixture.

Put odor remover on the shelves

Baking soda isn’t just for mixing with water to clear out the gunk – it’s also great for getting rid of the smell. All you need to do is spread baking soda on a metal tray and place it inside to soak up the nasty odors. Alternatively, you can also mix a half-cup of baking soda with a tablespoon of vanilla for a more thorough job at neutralizing tougher smells. Other substances also work, like a cup of white vinegar or pieces of charcoal.

Use airtight containers

If you have any leftovers that you need to store, be sure to use an airtight container. By doing this, not only do you keep the interior from smelling, but you also make the items inside your fridge more manageable. You should also label and date them to serve as a reminder to use them as soon as possible before they start going bad.

Keep fresh foods in sight

Fresh foods are best consumed quickly, but when they’re in the back of the fridge, you’re much less likely to notice them. In fact, many foods can often go bad because of this, and this means more food goes to waste. To deal with this problem, simply put them in front instead. This makes you more likely to remember that they’re there and that you should eat them first.

Guide to Preventing Glassware from Becoming Cloudy

If you’ve cleaned glassware for a while, whether it’s through handwashing or by using a dishwasher, you might have noticed that no matter how hard you scrub with a dishwashing liquid, there would always be athat thin milky coat covering your glassware.

While this doesn’t exactly pose a direct health problem, it can be a little annoying to see white blotches on what would otherwise be pristine glassware, and there are two reasons why this is the case: hardwater deposits and etching.

Hard Water Deposits

One of the most common problems when it comes to cleaning glassware is the high mineral content in water. If this is the case for your kitchen tap water, you have what is known as “hard water”.

There are two problems with this: first, the mineral content can reduce the effectiveness of detergents used, which means you’ll need to use more detergent to deal with it.

Here’s what you can do to deal with hard water deposits on your glassware:

  • Check your water temperature.  Your tap water might be too cold, so if you have a water heater, try to use it when cleaning your glassware. If you don’t, try heating
  • Use a rinsing aid. Rinse aids can help you by reducing hte spotting and etching, but keep in mind that these are added with each dishwashing load.
  • Just add more detergent. Simply using more detergent might be effective at removing hard water deposits, but it might leave a soap film on your glassware if you’re not careful.

Etching

If vinegar, water temperature, or detergent isn’t enough to get rid of the staining on your glassware, the reason for it might be etching.

When you see this etching, this measns that the glass itself is being worn down through constant washing , the use of water that’s too soft, detergent that’s too harsh, or even too much pre-cleaning. The result is all kinds of tiny pits and scratches that can’t be removed.

Here’s what you can do to control the etching on your glassware:

  • Rinse gently. Most dishwashing detergents contain harsh alkaline salts neutralized by oils and food particules, but when all the residue is removed, the detergent will instead have a harsher effect on the glassware itself.
  • Try something else. Some detergents are harsher than others depending on how soft the water is. One way to minimize etching is to try a milder detergent that doesn’t use phosphates.
  • Use less detergent. If you have soft water coming out of your kitchen tap, you don’t need to use as much detergent or dishwashing soap. Try experimenting with varying amounts until you find just the right amount that will keep your glassware spot-free.

How to Clean Your Coffee Maker in Four Simple Steps

Having a coffee maker is a great investment if you love coffee, but it’s easy to ignore the fact that it needs regular cleaning and care until it starts affecting your coffee’s flavor, and it can even worsen your brewer’s drip efficiency. And because coffee grounds have their own natural oils, you can’t just clean them by rinsing with water – you need the right tools and materials to keep having that amazing cup every morning.

What You’ll Need

Be sure to keep these in handy fo when you clean your coffee maker:

  • Soft cloth
  • Sponge brush
  • Vinegar
  • Dishwashing liquid
  • Extra water filter (optional)

Instructions

Now that you have the things you need, here’s how you can clean your coffee maker in five simple steps:

1.  Remove the brew basket and filter

Remove the basket every time after using the coffee maker. Be sure to discard the used grounds, and if you’re using a paper filter, be sure to discard that, too.

2.  Use hot water

The best way to clean a coffee maker is by using hot water to help lift off the accumulated coffee residue from the basket. Hot water also helps you kill any yeast or bacteria growing on the brew basket or on the coffee maker’s drip mechanism. With the hot water ready, scrub it clean with a sponge brush and a dishwashing liquid that’s specifically made to remove oils. Be sure to pay close attention to any tiny nooks or crannies that you might miss.

3.  Clean and rinse

Be sure to discard any remaining coffee grounds and thoroughly rinse the parts of the coffee maker, such as the brew basket, the carafe, and the lid, and make sure to remove every trace of residue. Wipe the parts down with a soft cloth and allow them to dry.  Be sure to dampen a cloth in fresh water to wipe away and remaining soap residue, and once they’re fully dry, put them back together for their next use.

4.  Run a drip cycle

The last step is to fill the water reservoir using a solution of equal parts vinegar and water and place a paper filter in the brew basket. Next, allow your coffee maker to run through half a drip cycle and stop midway in order to allow the solution to sit both in the reservoir and pass through the water channel. Wait for about half an hour before finishing the brew cycle.

Once the brew cycle is finished, discard the vinegar and water solution, replace the paper filter, and run the cycle again with plain water. This time, allow the coffee maker to fully cool down.

Get to Know the Types of Eggs for Different Recipes

Eggs are considered a good source of protein, and in fact some types of vegetarians augment their diet with eggs because they are inexpensive and easy to obtain. Eggs are also versatile ingredients because they can used for different recipes all over the world. But did you know you can use other types of eggs besides the chicken eggs you commonly find in stores?

Let’s look at the different types of eggs you can use for cooking.

• Araucana Eggs: The slightly bluish green color of the eggs will look different from the traditional white and brown chicken eggs, but Araucana eggs also come from chickens. Studies show that these eggs have higher cholesterol content, but some people enjoy the variety of egg colors that can be produced from a Araucana chickens.

• Duck Eggs: They are slightly larger than chicken eggs but look nearly identical to them, although the egg white is slightly more transparent. It has been found that duck eggs contain more cholesterol and fat than chicken eggs, but they contain more protein.

• Goose Eggs: Larger than chicken eggs, goose eggs can be kept for up to six weeks because they have a longer shelf-life. It also contains more calories, but it has more vitamins and minerals because the ratio of the yolk to the white is higher.

• Guinea Fowl Eggs: These beautiful white eggs speckled with brown spots are considered rare because the female can lay up to 60 eggs annually. You can substitute chicken eggs with guinea fowl eggs because they produce a rich, delicate flavor.

• Gull Eggs: The eggs are smaller in size and are covered with brown blotches, but they are just as tasty as well-prepared chicken eggs. Some people swear they have a slightly fishy taste, because gulls mainly consume fish, but for some, they taste just like chicken eggs.

• Quail Eggs: Considered to contain a lot of cholesterol, quail eggs are still popular ingredients in rice broths, salads, and condiments throughout Asia.

• Pheasant Eggs: The shells either have a green or brown-colored shell but are almost as tiny as quail eggs. Pheasant eggs are popular ingredients in some salads and sandwiches because of the rich flavor from the bright yellow yolk.

• Emu Eggs: These eggs are rare because the birds produce less eggs than chickens within a breeding season. People love them for their dark colors, which can appear dark green or teal. Emu eggs take longer to cook if you want hard-boiled eggs, but they can be prepared in different ways similar to chicken eggs. Generally, the eggs contain more fat and have a stronger flavor.

• Ostrich Eggs: Each egg can weigh up to 2 kilograms each and are tricky to cook if you don’t know that the eggs retain heat. It also takes up to 2 hours to boil an ostrich egg.

• Turkey Eggs: The brown eggs are much larger than brown chicken eggs, although the turkey produces less eggs than chickens. Turkey eggs are prized for their creamy yolks.